We need to talk about ethics

By Claudia Rondon *

Brazil is experiencing an unprecedented situation, caused by the deep crisis that involves ethical and moral values. We Brazilians have to face the dimension of corruption. We always knew that there was corruption in the spheres of power, but Operation Lava Jato brought to light details and figures never imagined. The size and constancy of corruption makes us indignant. We have to turn this indignation into an opportunity, so that the country can change, once and for all.

The change will come with the new generations. But what do today's young people think about corruption and ethics? To get that answer, the Brazilian Institute of Competition Ethics (ETCO), a client of RP1, ordered a survey from Datafolha. The research, qualitative and quantitative, was carried out with 1.048 young people between 14 and 24 years old in 130 municipalities across the country.

The conclusion: 90% of young people consider Brazilian society as having little or no ethics. Reproducing what we traditionally do, young people attribute misconduct to others. When assessing themselves, the rate changes: 63% say they are ethical most of the time in their daily lives. The family has a better image, although in a still problematic scene: 57% consider family members to be unethical or not at all ethical. Friends are seen as unethical or unethical by 74% of respondents.

Worrisome. Even more worrying is the disbelief in change. For 56%, no matter what you do, society will always be unethical. Most also have a flexible and elastic view of ethics: 55% admit that it is impossible to be ethical all the time. More. They say they can act unethically if they don't harm anyone.

There is hope when it comes to professions. The survey asked for an evaluation from 0 to 10 in ten professional categories. Firefighters are considered the most ethical (grade 8,7), followed by teachers (8,5). Finally, of course, are politicians (2,2).

There is also hope when it comes to discussing the topic. For 87% of young people, talking about it with family and friends would make Brazilian society more ethical.

Precisely to discuss the issue further, ETCO has developed an online platform that will support teachers to address the topic in the classroom (www.eticaparajovens.com.br). That's right. We need to talk about ethics. At home, at school, at work, in society.

Claudia Rondon is president of the Directive Council of the Brazilian Association of Communication Agencies (Abracom) and president and founder of RP1 Comunicação

A society without ethics

By Luiz Gonzaga Bertelli, President of CIEE / SP

The result of a recent survey is worrying: for 90% of young people aged 14 to 24, Brazilian society is little or not ethical. In this universe, not only politicians enter, which would be a predictable effect in view of the flood of denunciations and lawsuits against them. The family members themselves belong to the category of little or not at all in the opinion of 57% of the interviewees, as is the case with friends, for 74%. And how do they see themselves? If 63% say they seek to behave correctly on a daily basis and only 8% believe it is possible if ethical all the time.

Leaving the conceptual field and falling into a more objective questioning, the firmness is reduced. While more than 50% agree that, in a purchase, it is important to check if the company pays taxes and respects the environment, 52% admit to buying pirated products because they are cheaper and, worse, trust that, with this, they do not harm anyone, forgetting that part of the taxes cost public services.

Among the regrettable aspects of the research, carried out by the Brazilian Institute of Ethics in Competition (Etc.) and Datafolha, three negative perceptions stand out: 56% think that, no matter the effort, society will always be unethical; it is impossible to be ethical all the time (55%); and to make money, it is not always possible to be ethical.

The study, however, points to a way to change this view on ethics, whose appreciation will be one of the factors that will prevent the repetition of the sad parade of businessmen, executives, government officials, politicians, employees of all ranks dragged to the courts, under the accusation. appropriation of public money. It turns out that, with regard to professionals with a better image among young people, the list is headed by firefighters (note 8,7), followed by teachers (8,5). This perception launches on teachers the mission of shaping, with practice and theory, the hearts and minds of new generations. In fact, this task is not exclusive to them, but to all Brazilians responsible and willing to build a fairer and more prosperous country.

 

Article published in the newspaper Diário de São Paulo, on 13/07/2017

 

75% of the population in the Southeast say that smuggling favors crime, points out Datafolha Research

                         Society is aware that smuggling finances organized crime
                                 and drug and arms trafficking and calls for tax review

smuggling

 

Datafolha research shows that 75% of society in the Southeast is aware that the trade in illegal products favors the growth of violence and crime. The smuggling of cigarettes from Paraguay, the main smuggled product, is who supplies the cash and funds the activities of criminal factions.

Commissioned by the Brazilian Institute of Ethics in Competition (ETCO), in partnership with the National Forum Against Piracy and Illegality (FNCP), the unprecedented survey also reveals that 86% of respondents in the region believe that the high tax rates on products manufactured in Brazil favor the increase of smuggled in the national territory, mainly coming from Paraguay.

Even aware of this reality, when asked about the consumption of contraband products, 25% of respondents in the Southeast admit the habit of buying illegal products, such as electronics, clothes, shoes, DVDs of games and films and cigarettes.

Almost 90% of the Southeast population is in favor of revising taxes on legal products to make their price more affordable and more competitive compared to illegal ones. In addition, half of Brazilians believe that the federal government is primarily responsible for the entry of smuggled products into the country.

“The survey shows that the main stimulus to smuggling is the difference between the price, the result of the financial advantage that criminals have due to the tax disparity between Brazil and Paraguay. In other words, there is a need for greater inspection at the borders of the Midwest and a review of taxes on national products so that we have full legality in the domestic market and more security ”, ponders Edson Vismona, president of the Brazilian Institute of Ethics in Competition.

"Society is also aware that it is the responsibility of the Federal Government and other authorities to combat smuggling in Brazil and, consequently, to increase crime, with drug and arms trafficking," concludes Vismona.

In addition to violence and drug trafficking, unemployment and tax evasion are also traces left by smuggling illegal products. Every year, Brazil loses about R $ 115 billion with the trade of illegal goods, enough to build 974 hospitals, or 57 thousand daycare centers or 22 thousand public schools.

 

The impact of smuggling on the reality of Brazilians

In an article published in the newspaper A Tribuna, in Espírito Santo on 14/10, the President of ETCO, Edson Vismona, talks about the conclusions of the Datafolha survey on smuggling and what is needed to fight it.

 

The impact of smuggling on the reality of Brazilians

by Edson Vismona

An unprecedented survey commissioned by the Brazilian Institute of Competitive Ethics (ETCO) for Datafolha brings surprising data. The survey of more than 900 people in the Southeast of the country shows that the majority of respondents (75%) believe that the entry of smuggled products in the country favors the growth of violence and crime.

And even more alarming: even in the face of this information, most respondents recognize that they will continue to buy illegal goods.

But what makes the smuggled product so attractive? Another question asked in the research can elucidate this question: the high taxes practiced in Brazil. For 86% of respondents, the increase in taxes on Brazilian products favors the entry of contraband products. This is because due to taxation, the national product generally costs more. It is the question of price.

Take for example the most smuggled product to Brazil, cigarettes, in which the tax burden can exceed 80%. It is not difficult to conclude why, currently, 30% of the Brazilian mark is dominated by contraband brands, generating, in 2015 alone, tax evasion of R $ 4,9 billion to public coffers. Currently, 19% of the Espírito Santo cigarette market is dominated by illegal brands.

Between 2012 and 2015, the smuggled cigarette market jumped 6% in the state, while the formal market suffered a similar contraction. while brands like Gifty and Bill are sold for an average price of R $ 3,77 - below the minimum price of R $ 5,00 established by law - the state accounts for losses of R $ 75 million, just due to tax evasion between 2012 and 2015. Therefore, they lose the government and the population and the criminals, extremely successful in their business, carried out on the margins of any Law, win.

It is certain that a tax measure would be of great help and could have significant effects. In the case of cigarettes, specifically, such a measure should seek a balance that would allow the effectiveness of tax adjustments in terms of reducing consumers from the legal to the illegal market, as recommended by the WHO itself.

In addition to the tax issue, the fragility of borders also needs to be fought, as it represents one of the main opportunities to face this crime. Specifically in relation to this point, the federal government has already been sensitized and determined the creation of a working group formed by several ministries related to the subject. A recent report by the Federal Court of Accounts (TCU) pointed out several opportunities for efficiency and, mainly, governance for the resolution of the border problem, which is of public interest and national sovereignty.

In the fight against smuggling, it is necessary, however, that the authorities, both at the federal and state levels, understand what society has already understood: tax increases are no longer tolerable and the government has a fundamental role in the establishment of an environment of legality and fair competition in the Brazilian domestic market.

The impact of smuggling on the reality of Brazilians

Edson Vismona

A unpublished research commissioned by the Brazilian Institute of Competitive Ethics (ETCO) for Datafolha brings surprising data. The survey carried out with more than 900 people from the south-east of the country shows that the majority of respondents (75%) believe that the entry of smuggled products in the country favors the growth of violence and crime. And even more alarming: even in the face of this information, most respondents recognize that they will continue to buy illegal goods.

But what makes the smuggled product so attractive? Another question asked in the research can elucidate this question: the high taxes practiced in Brazil. For 86% of respondents, the increase in taxes on Brazilian products favors the entry of contraband products. This is because, due to taxation, the national product generally costs more. It is the question of price.

Take for example the most smuggled product to Brazil, cigarettes, where the tax burden can exceed 80%. It is not difficult to conclude why, currently, 30% of the Brazilian market is dominated by smuggled brands, generating, in 2015 alone, tax evasion of R $ 4,9 billion to public coffers.

Currently, 19% of the Espírito Santo cigarette market is dominated by illegal brands. Between 2012 and 2015, the contraband cigarette market jumped 6% in the state, while the formal market suffered an equal contraction. While brands like Gifty and Bill are sold for an average price of R $ 3,77 - below the minimum price of R $ 5,00 established by law - the state accounts for losses of R $ 75 million, just due to tax evasion between 2012 and 2015. Therefore, they lose the government and the population and the criminals, who are extremely successful in their business, carried out on the margins of any Law, win.

It is certain that a tax measure would be of great help and could have significant effects. In the case of cigarettes, specifically, such a measure should seek a balance that would allow the effectiveness of tax adjustments in terms of reducing consumption, without, however, causing the migration of consumers from the legal to the illegal market, as recommended by the WHO itself.

In addition to the tax issue, the fragility of the borders also needs to be combated, as it represents one of the main opportunities to face this crime. Specifically in relation to this point, the federal government has already been sensitized and determined the creation of a working group formed by several ministries related to the subject. A recent report by the Federal Court of Accounts (TCU) pointed out several opportunities for efficiency and, mainly, governance for the resolution of the border problem, which is of public interest and national sovereignty.

In the fight against smuggling, however, it is necessary that the authorities, both at the federal and state levels, understand what society has already understood: tax increases are no longer tolerable and the government has a fundamental role in establishing an environment legality and fair competition in the Brazilian domestic market.

vismona_menor-still
Edson Vismona is executive chairman of ETCO - Brazilian Institute of Competition Ethics

Article published in the newspaper A Tribuna (ES) on 14/10/2016

Smuggling and organized crime

Datafolha research, commissioned by the Brazilian Institute of Ethics in Competition (ETCO), shows that 75% of Brazilians believe that the reduction of taxes on national cigarettes would contribute to the fight against organized crime. Cigarette smuggling, mainly from Paraguay, is the one who supplies the cash and funds the activities of criminal factions, such as drug and arms trafficking.

Check the search result in PDF format

 
Check out the results of the survey conducted between August 23 and 27, 2016, with 2.081 people in Brazil.

 

Brazilians' perception of smuggling

In March 2018, ETCO sponsored a new search of Datafolha on the perception of Brazilians in relation to smuggling. Check out.
 

Press highlights research on smuggling

Research reveals that one in three Brazilians has already bought contraband products

The unprecedented survey that showed how Brazilians see smuggling, released in May, had great repercussions in the media. Hundreds of newspapers, magazines and radio and television stations highlighted the study, which revealed that 77% of people believe that smuggling harms the country and 86% see a relationship between this practice and other crimes. The survey was carried out by Datafolha at the request of ETCO-Brazilian Institute of Competition Ethics, with the support of the Movement in Defense of the Brazilian Legal Market.

At least 92 vehicles from 9 states made their own report on the subject. In addition, it was released by agencies that distribute content to vehicles across the country, such as Agência Brasil and RádioWeb - only the latter accounted for the transmission of the news by 269 stations in 26 states.

One of the biggest highlights was given by Bom Dia Brasil, from Rede Globo, the most watched morning newscast in the country. In all, the program devoted more than 6 minutes to the topic in its May 25 edition, the date of the research's release. In addition to the report and comments made by presenters Ana Paula Araújo, Chico Pinheiro and Rodrigo Bocardi, the results pointed out by the research were the subject of analysis by journalist Alexandre Garcia, who addressed the problems brought by smuggling to the Brazilian economy and the role of the government in combating this practice.

Still on television, the research had repercussions on open networks, such as TV Gazeta, from São Paulo, and SBT, and cable channels, such as Bandnews TV and Globonews - in the latter, with the presence of ETCO president Evandro Guimarães. He also participated in the journalist Milton Jung's program - broadcast during the most popular time on CBN radio - and was the author of an article on the subject published in the Folha de S.Paulo newspaper the day after the research was published.

 

Click here and watch the full article in the Bom Dia Brasil newspaper

Click here and access the main research data

 

Datafolha shows what the Brazilian thinks about smuggling

cover researchThe Brazilian knows that smuggling causes enormous damage to the nation, attracts consumers because it does not pay the country's high taxes, markets low quality products, encourages organized crime and benefits from the inefficiency with which it is fought by the government. These were the main conclusions of an unprecedented survey by Datafolha, commissioned by ETCO-Brazilian Institute of Ethics in Competition with support from the Movement in Defense of the Brazilian Legal Market, released on May 25.

"The survey revealed that Brazilians understand the seriousness of the problem," said Evandro Guimarães, president of ETCO. "It also showed that the population supports a more rigorous fight against smuggling."

The study had wide-ranging repercussions in the media. On the day it was released, for example, it was the subject of reporter e comment from the program Good morning Brazil, TV Globo, and interview on CBN radio in São Paulo.

Datafolha heard 2.401 people over the age of 16 between April 22 and 24, across the country. The study has a margin of error of 2 percentage points to more or less. Check out the main numbers.

 

 What the Brazilian thinks

cause

92% If the legal product were cheaper, the Brazilian would not buy the contraband.

89% The contraband product costs less because it pays no taxes.

effect

77% Smuggling harms the country and the population

80% Harm to domestic trade and industry.

77% Smuggled products are made from the worst quality materials.

 

crime

86% Smuggling encourages organized crime and drug trafficking.

83% It is a crime to sell contraband.

74% It is a crime to buy contraband.

 

answer

48% The federal government is primarily responsible for the entry of contraband into the country.

90% The government is little or not efficient in combating smuggling.

 The solution

61% The solution is to strengthen policing at borders and penalties for smugglers.

 

Listen to the interview given to Radio CBN / SP (25/05/2015)